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Gallery – Worth the wait

Architect John Leroux passed the same overgrown lot in a historic Fredericton neighbourhood for years before finally building his dream home on it. Read the whole story here.

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  • Vines, climbing wires strung vertically between Ikea shelf brackets, wind their way up the west side of the house and turn red when the weather turns cold.
  • The window placement is a great example of where the house is quietly, subtly, subversively modern.
  • Outside a west-facing window is a Japanese-style pond of floating lilies, home to two Koi carp and three goldfish the family plans to relocate indoors for the winter.
  • At the top of the stairs, enormous pipe organ reeds from the 1880s, salvaged from the city’s iconic Wilmot United Church, dominate the wall.
  • A hallway library built of plywood and plumbing conduits holds the family’s huge collection of art books, comics, history, and fiction.
  • “It’s really started to feel like a home,” says Meghan Leroux, who moved her family into the house in 2014. “I love the openness of it, and the feeling of nature.”
  • The house is designed so you can live on one floor; after a serious car accident in 2006, John used a wheelchair. It took years of recovery before he was able to walk again.
  • The living room gallery wall features Jack Humphrey, Herzl Kashetsky, and Fred Ross, alongside a Thaddeus Holownia photograph, a Christopher Pratt print of a Sackville attic, a Molly Lamb Bobak study for stained-glass windows at the University of New Brunswick, a Glenn Priestley portrait of Meghan Leroux, and a Halifax sketch from John Leroux’s university days.
  • “We wanted to make sure every room was used by the family,” says Meghan. “We spend most of our time in the main room, but even in the front room where the kids hang out, it’s still connected.”
  • The polished concrete floor creates a neutral backdrop and allows the colours of the grass and trees outside the window to shine.
  • The house is designed so you can live on one floor; after a serious car accident in 2006, John used a wheelchair. It took years of recovery before he was able to walk again.
  • The kitchen area offers a range of seating opportunities.
  • John chats with his children Ana, 7, and Tait, 10, in the spacious kitchen.
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  1. Is the photo gallery working?

  2. Janice Hudson

    It seems to be on our end. There are arrows on the bottom right-hand side that you can click to go through the photos. The captions appear on the top. Let us know if you are having problems.

  3. Love the polished concrete floors. Can anyone comments on the cost of this versus more tradition flooring (hardwood or ceramic tile)? Does it allow for in-floor heating?

  4. Janice Hudson

    Great question; I’ll send a note to the homeowner/architect and pass on what he recommends.

  5. Janice Hudson

    Hi Stephanie. I heard back from homeowner/architect John Leroux and he says, “The polished concrete floor compares very well to the supply and install cost of hardwood or ceramic. It ended up being about $6 per square foot, but it should be noted that this wasn’t only a polish job (as is typical), it was the actual grinding down about 1/4 inch to expose the stone aggregate, so it involved much more time. So just a simple concrete pad polishing should be less than the $6 amount. And the very reason I chose this in the end was to allow for the most efficient floor for in-floor radiant hydronic heating. It works amazingly well.”

  6. Thank you for the quick answer. Great info! Stephanie

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